Biscuit Success

This is one of those weird mornings.  It was an early wake-up morning for Scott, which means extra morning time at home for me.  Not extra sleep time.  If I tried to get extra sleep after waking up once, I would never ever wake up.  Ever.  I’m talking 2020, still happily asleep, fired years ago for not making it to work.

So with sleep off the table, that usually puts good old-fashioned chores on the table.  Laundry and dishes and everything under the sun.

But this morning, I couldn’t muster the energy for chores.  Instead, it’s been an epic TV/couch morning.  It’s been beautiful.  (I did in fact find the momentum to put away clean dishes from the dishwasher during commercials.  I can handle five minutes of work per 45 minutes of TV, even during down time.)

I also have some laurels to rest on today, because last night I conquered the buttermilk biscuit.  Thanks to Southern Living’s Buttermilk Biscuit recipe, I am no longer a biscuit failure.

For the past three years, Scott and I have been taking excellent biscuit recipes (I assume) and ruining them with whole wheat flour.  We were trying to make biscuits healthier, which isn’t wrong as a goal.  What’s wrong is turning something that’s supposed to be light and fluffy into a small, dense brick.  These are not bricks, and they are also not whole wheat:

biscuits

You can go ahead and ignore the dog hair on the cookie sheet.  That’s just extra protein (or roughage or something good).

While I think the flour is 90% of the genius, I will say that I like this recipe.  It’s simple, and that’s good.  I also like using buttermilk, because you can make it yourself.  Did you know that?  Just put slightly less than a cup of milk into some sort of container, then add one tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice, and wham.  Buttermilk.

And last but not least, I like that I learned a new biscuit trick this past weekend, and I think it worked.  Instead of using a pastry cutter to turn the butter and flour into a biscuit mixture, try grating your cold butter.  That’s right.  If you grate it with a cheese grater, it turns into tiny pieces of butter that integrate better than slices with the flour.  Perfect little pockets of butter.  That’s especially handy if you don’t have a pastry cutter thing.  I don’t.

So there you go.  That’s all of the biscuit genius I have to offer, and I’m happy to say that it worked.

(Links acting funny again, but you can get to the Southern Living recipe by clicking on the biscuit picture.)

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Biscuit Success

  1. Oh, I forgot to say, “Congrats on your biscuit success!” I, too, have been trying to make more whole grain foods, but have found the the texture of my bread is a little more to my kids’ liking when I include some white flour.

    • Thanks for both of your kind comments! Hopefully we’ll both find the right balance of whole grain and good taste/texture soon. In the meantime, I’m even enjoying the flops from our kitchen. Meh bread is still homemade bread. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s